August 2, 2012

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Why We(Otakus) Like Fakes?

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The growing number of businesses related to anime/otaku culture mushroomed in the number. We can all give big thanks to those who made it an industry so that everyone can commercialize their craft in a more civilized fashion. However, with this comes the appearance of tens if not hundreds of pirated DVDs as well as counterfeit anime figures and items. The public doesn't seem to mind, but it's a big hindrance, especially to those collectors. 87Y8CBXKSCD6

Based on local copyright laws, a copyright claim must first be issued in the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) before any kind of copyright lawsuit can be filed upon. This means that big anime companies cannot fight back when somebody manages to copy their work. It is a fact that some companies are outsourcing their animators locally to produce their work but do they have the time to file for a copyright claim? Are they willing to spend time and money to protect their work in a country where copyright enforcement is at a bare minimum?

Try to add that up with the rise of companies that specializes in selling these kinds of merchandise. No copyright claim means they don't need to file for a license to TOEI, BANDAI, and the others. For them, it reduces their expenses and more time to produce counterfeits. And it might surprise you that your "anime corner" stores in most places are promoting the selling of counterfeits.

The Bottom Line : 
No license claims = Widespread selling of counterfeits
Cheapskate Otakus = More demand for fakes
Minimal Regulation = Fakes will stay       
             
So what is it for the consumer? Well, you would probably be buying these because of the price am I right? Figuring that the price margin of an original is double or triple than a counterfeit, it's not a bad choice for starters. For the hardcore collectors, there might be a chance that one of your items is in fact a fake. Fake or not, it's the consumer's choice what to buy. If you hate fakes, then learn on how to spot them. For the typical cheapskate otaku, learn to accept it. The regular consumer can buy fakes for a starting collector then gradually fill the collection with real, genuine, merchandise.

So the biggest question would be .... does it matter? 

(We are not in any form promoting otaku piracy. This post aims to explain its 
proliferation with the intention of informing anyone it's problems and realizations)